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D. New Hope For Treatment Resistant Heart Patients

Narrator: This is Science Today. Over seven million people have angina, a common symptom of coronary heart disease. While the majority of patients control these symptoms with medication, cardiologist Tony Chou of the University of California, San Francisco says many others seek relief through angioplasty or bypass surgery.

Chou: As anigoplasties and bypasses have developed and are reaching their technological limits, we're really creating this whole population of patients who can't have angioplasties and bypasses anymore - they've just exhausted all those possibilities and they're still having angina.

Narrator: For those patients, there's hope in the form of a new treatment called enhanced external counterpulsation. Chou says this device resembles a giant blood pressure machine.

Chou: It actually squeezes the legs and the thighs and the calves in a way that it improves the bloodflow back to the heart during the time period when the heart is at rest.

Narrator: If you have angina and want to find out more about this treatment, Chou recommends consulting your cardiologist. For Science Today, I'm Larissa Branin.