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C. Does Gender Affect Knee Injury?

Narrator: This is Science Today. Injury is almost inevitable for professional athletes, but a group of researchers at the University of California, San Diego are looking into why women injure a ligament in the knee more than men. Robert Pedowitz, an assistant professor of sports medicine, is studying inter-collegiate male and female basketball and soccer players to see if these differences are inherent or if they're learned at an early age.

Pedowitz: It's really at the heart of the question and one of the things that we're looking at with our research is specifically, differences between highly trained athletes.

Narrator: Although it's expected that at that level of competition men and women would have equivalent skills, Pedowitz noted some subtle differences.

Pedowitz: For example, if you look at men and women basketball players, there's a difference in the way that women land from a jump and bend their knees and then turn. The question is whether those differences could be changed by training or teaching of children at a very, very young age and we don't know that yet.

Narrator: For Science Today, I'm Larissa Branin.