Sacramento Bee
April 27, 1960

Governor Signs Education Plan

By Richard Rodda

Governor Edmund G. Brown today signed SB 33, Miller, establishing a master plan for higher education in California. "I am proud that with this bill California takes the lead among the nationís states in giving direction and purpose to higher education," said Brown.

The legislation defines the roles and functions of the University of California and the state college system in higher education. It is officially known as the Donahoe Higher Education Act in honor of the late Assemblywoman Dorothy Donahoe of Kern County, a key figure in the program.

Tributes To Two

The governor paid a special tribute to Miss Donahoe and to Dr. Arthur Coons, president of Occidental College, who was chairman of a liaison committee which drafted the plan.

"Many others unselfishly contributed their time and talent to this plan and their efforts have given us the tools to build the finest higher education system in the country" said the governor.

Brown said the need for the plan is demonstrated by the fact enrolment in colleges and universities will jump from 270,000 to 536,000 in 10 years.

Major Provisions

The major provisions of the legislation are:

-Establishment of a board of trustees to administer the state colleges similar to the University of Californiaís board of regents.

-Creation of a coordinating council for higher education. This will include representatives of the university, the state colleges, junior colleges, private colleges and the public.

-A grant of exclusive jurisdiction to the university over instruction in law, graduate instruction in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, architecture, and exclusive authority to award doctorates in all fields, except that it may award joint degrees with state colleges.

To Define College Role

-Definition of the primary function of state colleges as instruction for undergraduates and graduates through the masterís degree in liberal arts, sciences, and the professions, including the teaching professions.

-Limitation of junior college instruction to the 14th grade in standard collegiate courses.

The plan will go into effect July 1, 1961.